Archivi tag: simulations

Galaxies and Cosmology in Light of Strong Lensing

The purpose of the workshop is to share the recent advances in strong lensing and discuss the future directions with current/upcoming facilities and wide-field surveys. Topics at the workshop include dark matter substructures, galaxy evolution, time-delay cosmology, galaxy clusters, high-z galaxies, simulations, and strong lens searches.

Evolving Galaxies in Evolving Environments

The programme of the conference will cover the following topics:

  • Evolving environments: clusters, groups, density field, clustering, dark matter environment, and how they depend globally on redshift)
  • Central galaxies: links between accretion, bulge growth, star formation & AGN feedback, including BCGs.
  • Multiphase gas and environment: observations and simulations of gas budget vs halo mass, hot gas (detection, cooling, stripping), warm gas (absorption studies, abundance), cold gas (detection of flows, abundance).
  • Satellite galaxies: direct evidence of interaction with environment, physical mechanisms, simulations, empirical trends.
  • Tight interactions and no interactions: merging, close pairs, compact groups, fossils/isolated galaxies, etc.

AGN vs star formation: the fate of the gas in galaxies

How is AGN activity connected to star formation? This remains one of the key unsolved questions in astronomy and cosmology. Both processes are efficiently driven by a cold gas supply and we therefore may expect a loose connection. However, a slew of empirical and theoretical evidence suggest an unexpectedly tight symbiotic link between AGN activity and star formation, whereby the fuelling and regulation of one process is dictated by the other. The effectiveness of this fuelling and regulation and (most crucially) whether it is predominantly dictated by AGN activity or star formation is a matter is intense debate, and has important implications for the growth of galaxies and black holes over cosmic time.

The objective of this international workshop is to bring together observers and theorists to discuss the connection between AGN activity and star formation on small (<100 pc), large (~0.1-10 kpc), and cosmological scales to address the following key questions:

  • What evidence is there for a symbiotic connection between AGN activity and star formation?
  • What physical processes drive gas into the centre/how does AGN and star formation compete for cold gas?
  • How does star formation control AGN activity?
  • What impact does AGN activity have on star formation?
  • How different would the Universe look without AGNs?
  • What key tests and observations do we need to make progress in the field?

Poster of the workshop

GREAT3 Mid-challenge Meeting

The third GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing challenge, or GREAT3, is a blind data analysis competition held by the world-wide weak lensing community to test weak lensing measurement algorithms. With several major astronomical surveys beginning to make large-scale cosmological weak lensing measurements in 2013 in order to better understand our cosmological model (including the mysterious dark matter and dark energy), this challenge will play an important role in identifying promising measurement algorithms and quantifying their performance.

The meeting will include a description of the GREAT3 challenge, guides to the simulated data, information on how to participate in GREAT3, and information about the public tools provided to make this easier. Throughout there will also be invited and contributed talks, and discussion, on cutting edge topics in weak gravitational lensing, inference, and image analysis for cosmology.

MICRA 2013

The MICRA workshop will bring together researchers in nuclear and neutrino physics, nuclear astrophyiscs, and in numerical modeling of relativistic astrophysical phenomena such as the mergers of neutron stars and core-collapse supernovae.

The overarching goal of the MICRA workshop is to improve the treatment of microscopic physics (neutrino-matter interactions, equations of state, thermonuclear reaction rates) in astrophysical simulations to improve their reliability and predictive power. Multi-messenger signal predictions from simulations will be crucial to interpret observations by the international network of advanced gravitational-wave detectors (to come online around 2015), by current and future neutrino detectors, and by classical astronomical observatories and high-energy satellite missions.