Archivi tag: gravitational waves

Hot Topics in General Relativity and Gravitation

This international conference will be held as part of the framework of the Recontres du Vietnam. Our aims are to discuss and review recent developments on:

  • Astrophysics of compact objects
  • Gravitational waves (experimental and theoretical)
  • Experimental gravity and tests of General Relativity
  • Alternative gravity theories and Cosmology related issues

The conference will consist of plenary sessions for indepth oral presentations (review talks and talks on specific specialised topics), parrallel and poster sessions (contributions sollicitated or selected from abstract submission). Special emphasis is being placed on active participation by young researchers and post-docs. A common plenary session with the conference Cosmology in the Planck Era is planned.

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SPT detects ‘weak signs’ of primordial gravitational waves in the CMB

spt_polarizationLa ricerca dei modi-B, relativi alla componente della polarizzazione della radiazione cosmica di fondo associata alla propagazione delle onde gravitazionali nella mappa della radiazione cosmica, rappresenta una prova fondamentale che potrebbe dare credito al modello dell’inflazione cosmica. Nonostante i calcoli prevedono una intensità del segnale molto debole, oggi alcuni ricercatori del South Pole Telescope (SPT) hanno pubblicato i dati di uno studio in cui dichiarano di aver rivelato deboli fluttuazioni associate ai modi-B della componente di polarizzazione.

Scientists believe that approximately half a million years after the Big Bang, the Universe began switching from a state of plasma and energy to one where temperatures had dropped to a point where the universe became transparent enough for light to pass through. That light is known as cosmic microwave background (CMB) and is still visible today. Cosmologists studying it have formed the basis of a theory known as inflation, where the Universe came to exist as it does today through a process of very rapid expansion just after the Big Bang. In order to prove that the inflation theory is correct, scientists have been studying minute fluctuations in the temperature of the CMB, they revel fluctuations in density of the early Universe. They also study fluctuations of the polarization of the CMB which is due, it is believed, to radiation being scattered across the Universe by the energy of the Big Bang. Fluctuations in polarization were for a time merely theory, but in 2002, they were actually detected, giving credence to inflation theory. Those fluctuations were given the name E-mode polarizations. Theory has also suggested that there are also B-mode fluctuations in polarization, which are far more subtle, they are thought to describe the rotation of CMB polarization.

Finding evidence of them has been extremely difficult, however, as they exist as just one part in ten million in the CMB temperature distribution. But now it appears the team at SPT has done just that, adding further credence to the inflation theory.

The researchers report that they were able to detect E-mode polarization due mostly to improvements in detector technology. Adding credence isn’t the same as finding proof of a theory, of course, and that’s why scientists believe the detection of E-mode polarizations is so important. Many believe it will ultimately lead to the detection of primordial gravitational waves, immense ripples in spacetime that theory suggests should have come about as a result of the force of inflation. If they can be detected, the theory of inflation would likely become the accepted theory regarding the early formation of the Universe.

Nature: Polarization detected in Big Bang's echo
arXiv: Detection of B-mode Polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background with Data from the South Pole Telescope

EWASS 2013

Finland will attend the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science, which is going to be held on 8 – 13 July 2013 in Logomo Centre in Turku, Finland. EWASS is the annual meeting of the EAS. On Saturday, 13 July, is also the Plenary discussion on the ASTRONET Mid-Term Review that is closely connected to the EWASS meeting.

The programme for the EWASS 2013 has now been finalized, but small additions are still possible. The pdf-version of the programme with all the timetables and details can be downloaded here. We are going to print this for the meeting and you will have this during the registration.

Symposia

S1: Solar activity and its manifestations in the heliosphere (PI Rami Vainio)
S2: The physics of accretion on compact objects (PI Juri Poutanen)
S3: Science with Planck data (PI Pekka Heinämäki)
S4: The mystery of ellipticals (PI Peter Johansson)
S5: Local group, local cosmology (PI Matteo Monelli/Stefania Salvadori)
S7: Stellar magnetic activity across the HR diagram (PI Maarit Mantere)
S8: Deaths of massive stars as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (PI Seppo Mattila)
S9: Extreme physics of neutron stars (PI Dmitry Yakovlev)
S10:The co-evolution of black holes and galaxies (PI Jari Kotilainen)
S11: Gaia research for European astronomy training (PI Nicholas Walton)
S12: The gamma-ray sky in the era of Fermi and Cherenkov telescopes (PI Tuomas Savolainen/Elina Lindfors)

Special sessions

Sp1: Astronomy education and public outreach (PI Mikko Hanski)
Sp2: RADIONET: “The role of modern radio observatories in black hole and jet studies” (F.Mantovani/T. Savolainen/M. Tornikoski)
Sp3: Fundamental stellar parameters (PI Luca Casagrande)
Sp4: The origin of interstellar dust (PI Patrice Bouchet)
Sp5: Thick discs: clues for galaxy formation and evolution (PI Sebastien Comeron)
Sp6: AGN, galaxy mergers, supermassive black holes and gravitational waves (PI Stefanie Komossa/Mauri Valtonen)
Sp7: Science with present and future interferometric instruments (PI Jean Surdej)
Sp8: Galactic molecular clouds and their chemistry (PI Mika Juvela)
Sp9: Stellar dynamics and celestial mechanics in modern astrophysics (PI Rainer Spurzem/Seppo Mikkola)
Sp10: Chemo-dynamical galaxy evolution (PI Gerhard Hensler)
Sp11: Rocks in our Solar System (PI Tomas Kohout)
Sp12: A fresh look at the stellar initial mass function (PI Ignacio Ferreras)
Sp13: Starburst galaxies now and then with ALMA (PI Jari Kotilainen)
Sp14: LOFT, the large observatory for X-ray timing (PI Enrico Bozzo)

Latest results from the neutron-star laboratory

SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, the Astronomical Institute “Anton Pannekoek” of the University of Amsterdam, and ASTRON Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy are organizing a 5-day conference detailing the latest developments in neutron star research. More than 45 years after the discovery of the first pulsar, neutron stars are now used as gravitational-wave detectors and astrophysical laboratories for studying the physics of ultra-high magnetic fields, gravity, and ultra-dense matter. We envisage a program highlighting the most recent results on radio (e.g. LOFAR, GBT, Arecibo) and high-energy (e.g. Fermi) searches for new pulsars as well as cutting-edge results from studies of known neutron-star systems and their surroundings. We also wish to capture the still expanding variety of neutron-star behavior, including talks on transient sources/events such as the RRATS and (giant) flares of magnetars. In addition, with LOFAR capabilities for monitoring the transient and pulsar sky becoming fully operational in 2012, it is opportune to confront the early results with those of the high-energy window.

STARS 2013 e SMFNS 2013

The events are the second and third in a series of meetings gathering scientists working on astroparticle physics, cosmology, gravitation, nuclear physics, and related fields. As in previous years, the meeting sessions will consist of invited and contributed talks and will cover recent developments in the following topics:
STARS2013 – New phenomena and new states of matter in the Universe, general relativity, gravitation, cosmology, heavy ion collisions and the formation of the quark-gluon plasma, white dwarfs, neutron stars and pulsars, black holes, gamma-ray emission in the Universe, high energy cosmic rays, gravitational waves, dark energy and dark matter, strange matter and strange stars, antimatter in the Universe, and topics related to these.
SMFNS2013 – Strong magnetic fields in the Universe, strong magnetic fields in compact stars and in galaxies, ultra-strong magnetic fields in neutron star mergers, quark stars and magnetars, strong magnetic fields and the cosmic microwave background, and topics related to these.

The 2° PANDA Symposium on Multi-messenger Astronomy

PANDA Symposia series are aiming at establishing and fostering collaborations among young post doctoral fellows (0-6 years from graduation) from the Pacific/Asiatic scientific community with their peers across the globe. Besides enabling scientific mobility and networking, we are also aiming in providing young researchers with a forum to exchange ideas on current and future projects.

The First PANDA Symposium was a great success. 23 astrophysicists from 9 foreign countries attended, as well as 78 astrophysicists from China. The Symposium was an outstanding international forum for discussion of various topics related to “Products of Astrophysical Outflows”, and addressed some of the most exciting research frontiers of high energy astrophysics. It provided many opportunities for Chinese researchers and advanced students to become acquainted with leaders in these fields and to present their own research results to an international audience. The Second PANDA Symposium will focus on multi-messenger Astronomy, which combines detections of electromagnetic signals from astrophysical sources with high energy neutrinos, cosmic ray (particle) astrophysics and gravitational waves.

Nordita Winter School 2013 in High-Energy Astrophysics

Nordita Winter School 2013 in High-Energy Astrophysics – The purpose of this winter school is to provide PhD students and young postdocs in the Nordic countries with introductory courses in a range of the most important topics in the field of theoretical astrophysics. Continua a leggere Nordita Winter School 2013 in High-Energy Astrophysics